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Monkeypox Fact Sheet

Rexdale Community Health Centre

Monkeypox
Monkeypox is viral zoonosis disease – meaning the virus is transmitted between species from animals to humans. The origins of the disease are unknown, but it was first identified in monkeys and is mostly found in central and western Africa.

What are the symptoms of Monkeypox?
Monkeypox symptoms include headache, fever, exhaustion, swollen lymph nodes, muscle aches. A rash often appears within a few days after symptoms begin and starts on the face spreads to other parts of the body and may last 2 to 4 weeks. A person is contagious until the scab crusts have fallen off and new skin has formed. Most people recover from Monkeypox on their own without treatment.

How does Monkeypox spread?
Monkeypox spreads through contact with body fluids such as fluids from the monkeypox sores, contaminated clothing or bedding, or through respiratory droplets following prolonged face-to-face contact. It can also be spread through bites or scratches from infected animals. People can spread Monkeypox through contact with body fluids, Monkeypox sores or by sharing contaminated items. Anyone can be contract Monkeypox, however, during this outbreak, in a number of countries, gay, bisexual and men who have sex with men have been affected.

What should I do if I develop Monkeypox symptoms?
If you think you have Monkeypox or you believe you may have been exposed, it is important to isolate right away and seek medical attention.

Standard household cleaning/disinfectants can be used to kill the virus.

For more information about Monkeypox, please visit:
City of Toronto’s Monkeypox webpage: (https://www.toronto.ca/community- people/health-wellness-care/health-programs-advice/monkeypox/) or through Toronto Public Health’s Health Connections online or by calling 416-338-7600.

Public Health Agency of Canada’s website (http://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/news/2022/05/public-health-agency-of-canada-confirms-2-cases-of-monkeypox.html).

Gay Men’s Sexual Health Alliance webpage (https://gmsh.ca/monkeypox/)

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